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SEED WHEEL
APRICOTS OF DONBAS
Masquerade
Where We Arrive

Catalog

DECANTING: Selected & New Poems | 1967 – 2017

by Stuart Friebert

From an imaginative master and influential teacher, a lifetime of poetry rooted in history and the natural world and brimming with life and exuberant expression. Friebert inspires creativity. Decanting belongs in every library.

—Marilyn Johnson, author of Lives in Ruins, This Book Is Overdue!, and The Dead Beat

Decomposition

Edited by Renée Roehl & Kelly Chadwick

. . . Gathered from the root-zones of many different trees, knife-scraped from rock-face, lifted from dung, spore-flung into air, these gathered mushroom poems offer undomestic, distinctive discoveries to all who choose to join the effort to find them.

—Jane Hirshfield

Detroit as Barn

by Crystal Williams

“Visionary, charged with tense grace, Crystal Williams’ new collection Detroit as Barn is an extraordinary act of redemption.”

DON’T TOUCH THE BONES | Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

by Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach

Rich in detail, Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach’s Don’t Touch the Bones is a compelling collection that examines the pain of the world’s, a nation’s, and a family’s history. 

Dragonfly Weather

by Lois Red Elk

With the launch of her new book, Dragonfly Weather, Lois Red Elk proves herself a consummate storyteller. With lyrical words and magical images, she draws the reader into a primeval, watery world of warm swamps, spiraling whirl winds and moist fog to experience her journey in time and space. Her dreams, ears and eyes become attuned to the ancient call of dragonflies, who exhorted her to be “swift in worth,” to “find value” in this new dragonfly season—to “Dance in dragonfly style, dodge dangers thrown / dare a step with lightening strike.” I am grateful to Lois that she has shared these sacred clan stories with us. We’la’lin.

—Alice M. Azure

East & West

by Piotr Florczyk

Each day we wake and begin an interior dialogue about what is ethical and what is tolerable on this planet. Poet and translator Piotr Florczyk demonstrates in his lyrical evocations what that conversation might look like as he negotiates the distance between urban and wild, settled and migrant, Krakow and Los Angeles. Piotr Florczyk’s literary elders showed us all how to think wisely, deeply, and with dark humor, about the last hundred years, and now Florczyk himself leads us boldly forward into the 21st century, weaving those very same gifts into fabulist’s miniatures of wonder and play.

—Sandra Alcosser, author of A Fish to Feed All Hunger

ECCENTRIC DAYS OF HOPE AND SORROW

by Natalka Bilotserkivets

The eighth volume in Lost Horse Press’s Contemporary Ukrainian Poetry series, Eccentric Days of Hope and Sorrow brings together a selection of Natalka Bilotserkivets poetry written over the last four decades

Evolution of the Genus Iris

by Robert Michael Pyle

Robert Michael Pyle’s poems respond to details, events, and emanations from the real, physical world and its species: humans and all the rest. The poems are based on or drawn from personal experiences and perceptions, mostly out-of-doors, and will appeal to the intelligent general reader, lovers of land and literature, fans of a good poem and a good story, and naturalists—which means anyone interested in the world and its occupants beyond themselves and their immediate self-concern.

Feeding Strays

by Stefanie Freele

A woman hides from her husband in a fish tank and another absently bakes sponges inside her tarts. Appliances drop from the sky, men grapple with chainsaws, women struggle with hormonal violence, and abandoned boys beg on doorsteps. Enter into the territory of broken people and the folks that love them. Sensitive and unruly, sincere and absurd, Stefanie Freele’s Feeding Strays is a collection of fifty short stories, both slipstream and modern, about children, family, relationships, and oysters.

Finding the Top of the Sky

by James Grabill

. . . In the face of the escalating inanity and aridness of post-industrial life, the fine pieces in this volume insist that compassion triumph over cruelty, meditative clarity over bombast and spin. It is a great delight to feel the weight of Grabill’s conviction (along with his immense talent) and, with sea lions, lorikeets, giant ferns, and humpback whales, to follow it to the top of the sky, where it is so much easier to see what matters and what does not.

—Christopher Howell